Science in the National Interest

[Photo of document cover with Presidental Seal]

"This country must sustain world leadership in science, mathematics, and engineering if we are to meet the challenges of today. . . and of tomorrow."

President William J. Clinton, November 23, 1993

What is This?

"Science in the National Interest" is a policy document, released on August 3, 1994, that details the Clinton Administration's commitment to Fundamental Science. It is the first Presidental statement on science policy since 1979, and reflects the efforts and contributions of a diverse group of individuals drawn from academia, industry, professional societies and associations, and government. The actions described in this document are being implemented by the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) , a cabinet-level body formed by President Clinton to guide the nation's scientific progress. "Science in the National Interest" sets five main goals for U.S. Science Policy:

This report is divided into the following sections:

A Message from the President and the Vice President

Science: The Endless Resource

A Time of Change

Setting Our National Goals

Reaching Our Goals

A Shared Commitment

You can also go directly to any of these examples of basic research:

Steering by the Satellites

A Key to Cancer

A New Chemistry for Carbon

Origins of the Information Superhighway

Monitoring the Earth

A Virtuous Infection

Seeing Inside the Body

Simulating Reality

Plastics that Glow

The Human Dimension

Bringing the Universe into Focus

Additional Materials

The Press Release for this Document

Congressional Testimony on this Document


Hardcopy Ordering Information

This homepage was created by the OSTP Science Division. If you have any questions, please contact Alex Colcord at:

[Clickable Image]

To comment on this service: